Feel Good Wednesday: Laugh A Little

Laughter...
Laughter… (Photo credit: leodelrosa…)

Whenever we feel rundown, stressed or simply exhausted, laughter can be quite uplifting. At work I find that even when I am having a particularly challenging day, laughing with my colleagues always makes things easier to deal with.
We’ve repeatedly heard varying quotes and sayings stressing the importance of laughter.

  • Laughter is the best medicine.
  • Charles Dickens a renowned author once wrote, ‘There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor.’
  • Hugh Sidey an American journalist who worked for Life magazine stated, ‘A sense of humor..is needed armour.’
  • Andrew Carnegie an extremely successful Scottish-American Steel industry entrepreneur and philanthropist in the 19th Century went as far as to say, ‘There is little success where there is little laughter.’

Evidently, laughter has the ability to cheer, comfort and bring people together.
To the best of my knowledge no solid research has confirmed that laughter presents potential health benefits. But if you ask me, being in a good mood and getting along with family, friends and colleagues due to a great sense of humor pose a fairly healthy environment.
Laughter enables us to have a positive attitude. This then gears us to approach scenarios positively. Also, it is common knowledge that smiling is infectious. When a complete stranger smiles while we walk by, it boosts our spirits and we go on to boost another’s spirit, and on and on.
Therefore, there is no harm in smiling and laughing.
How about we pass the smiling virus on today.
Smile a little, laugh a little!
Happy Feel Good Wednesday everybody! Laugh
 
© Valerie Chela N, all writers herein and Memoirs of a Kenyan, 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s authors and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to appropriate author of content and Memoirs of a Kenyan with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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